Will my Facebook post affect my employment?

Will my Facebook post affect my employment?

Can an employer intervene in an employees use of social media outside work?

A recent decision by the Fair Work Commission has shed some light on this question showing that having a detailed workplace policy can provide better protection for your company from damaging posts made by employees. Further, the decision has shown that employees need to think carefully before they comment on social media channels online.

The recent decision of Waters v Mt Arthur Coal Pty Limited concerned a dispute between an employee, Mr Waters, and his employer, the Mt Arthur open cut coal mine in the Hunter Valley. In the lead up to Christmas 2017, the coal mine was considering whether it would operate on Christmas and Boxing Day due to safety concerns arising from low staff numbers. It was announced two days before Christmas that operations would continue over these days.

Following this decision, an Industrial Safety and Health Representative issued a direction to suspend mining operation over the Christmas period due to the reduced emergency evacuation capacity. Mt Arthur received this direction but decided not to comply with it, and considered the safety risk not to be a real concern.

Mr Waters was a health and safety representative at the mine, and after receiving the safety direction he posted a Facebook status saying ‘Xmas & Boxing day shifts are off for good.’ Mr Waters was not aware this status was incorrect, and assumed the mine would comply with the safety direction. When Mr Waters confirmed with other staff members that the status was incorrect, he deleted it.

Mt Arthur terminated Mr Waters’ employment for being in contravention of a range of their workplace policies including the ‘distribution of material that is likely to cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to your colleagues’.

The Fair Work Commission found that the Facebook post was a valid reason for dismissal. They found that the post had a relevant connection to Mr Waters’ employment, was used to communicate operational matters with other employees and was likely to damage Mt Arthur’s interests in operating the mine. The post was ultimately found to be incompatible with Mr Waters’ obligations to comply with workplace policies.

The case provides a timely reminder for employees to be extremely careful with what they post on social media, especially if it relates to their work. It also highlights how important comprehensive workplace policies are for employers. However, employers must be conscious of identifying a connection between the social media post and employment before intervening with an employee’s use of social media use outside work hours.

If you would like to speak with one of our solicitors regarding social media and the workplace, please contact us on 9963 9800 or via our contact form.

Defamation – Be Careful What You Say On Social Media

Defamation – Be Careful What You Say On Social Media

Not many people are aware of the risks associated with posting on social media. Popular social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are not safe spaces to vent your thoughts. In fact in a recent defamation case, the defendant was ordered to pay a staggering amount in damages for his post on Twitter. In this blog, we explore the meaning of defamation and how it still applies in the modern age of social media.

What is Defamation?

Defamation is either an oral (called ‘slander’) or written (called ‘libel’) statement about someone which injures the reputation of that person.  In general terms, to prove defamation, one must show the existence of a false statement, which the defendant may try to argue that it was an honest opinion or a fair comment. In Australia, the Defamation Act 2005 sets out the rules regarding defamation law.

Can You Defame People on Social Media?

It is absolutely possible to defame people on social media in Australia and the defamed individual may bring proceedings against you for what you said.

In order to bring a successful defamation case against an individual who posted defamatory material on social media, the following must be satisfied:

  1. The material must be defamatory;
  2. The material must identify the plaintiff; and
  3. The material must have been published to a third party.

Are There Any Recent Case Law Examples?

A recent decision from March 2020 revealed that harsh penalties can be imposed for defamatory statements published on social media. The Supreme Court awarded $110,000 for damaged in relation to defamatory comments made on a Facebook page about the plaintiff.

In this case, a series of posts on a public Facebook page called “Narri Leaks” were made by the defendant Mr Stoltenberg. The post implied that, Mr Bolton, the Mayor of Narrabri Shire Council, was ‘corrupt, dishonest and intimidating in his role as Mayor’. Ms Loder, the other defendant, made “comments” on those Facebook posts.

Mr Bolton commenced defamation proceedings in the Supreme Court against both Mr Stoltenberg and Ms Loder. It was found that the Facebook posts were indeed defamatory, and that Mr Stoltenberg had no defences available to him.

What Can I Do If I Am Defamed Or Being Sued For Defamation?

It is always important to be aware that your activities on social media can have very costly consequences.

If you believe that you have been defamed or if you have been accused of defamation due to posts on your social media page, then you should seek legal advice immediately.

For assistance or advice on how to proceed please call on (02) 9963 9800 or get in touch via our contact form here.